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Exile In Paradise just in time for the Chinese New Year

11 Jan

Year of the Canine, 4715

Exile In Paradise “is alive with details to coax our attention, urge our sensitivity to the present.   Little happens while everything happens. . .Poems arise from the mists of west county. . .Only nature and the moment exist.”
—Robert Feuer,  Sonoma County Gazette
(
read the entire review in the Sonoma County Gazette)

November, 2017~$16.00~paper~6×9~ISBN 978-0-9840310-5-4

The poems of Exile In Paradise are derived from a lifelong appreciation of classical Chinese poetry. This selection by Pat Nolan marks an almost fifty year creative engagement with Asian literature in translation. Chinese poetry is image rich and largely dependent for its overall effect on the juxtaposition of these images in a discontinuous thread that is not unlike the successive frames of a film. Each of the poems finds its origin in a line translated from an ancient Chinese poet. Although removed by degrees of separation from the originals in time and language, their impulse remains the same: to call up the perceptual as a song of celebration in sacred engagement with the world.


More Praise for Exile In Paradise

“Nolan has given Solitude, itself, a voice in this rich lyric of nature.  A luminosity of flickering bursts pause and magnify now moments of being alive.  His quotidian soaks us with its presence.  His lines trace the air.”
—Maureen Owen, author of Erosion’s Pull and Edges of Water

“Reading these poems, I feel like I’m walking down a village lane somewhere in China, beyond the reach of the emperor’s minions, and every door I walk by, someone invites me in for a cup of wine. At this rate, I don’t think I’ll ever make it out of here, and why should I?”
—Bill Porter (Red Pine), translator, author of Finding Them Gone: Visiting China’s Poets from the Past


Pat Nolan has lived in silent cunning exile along the Russian River in Northern California for over forty years.  His poetry, prose and translations have appeared in numerous literary magazines and anthologies in North America, Europe and Asia.  He has worked as a bartender, rock band manager, trail crew grunt, radio DJ, janitor, preschool teacher, and emergency dispatcher.  The author of three novels and over a dozen poetry books, he is also publisher of Nualláin House, Publishers and maintains the literary blog for The New Black Bart Poetry Society.


Exile In Paradise
November, 2017
$16.00~paper~100 pages~6×9~ISBN 978-0-9840310-5-4

is available exclusively from the publisher
(locally at Many Rivers Books & Tea

Sebastopol, CA)
Go to How To Order for details

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Holiday Bargains

5 Dec

Happy 2018

Now Available from

Nualláin House, Publishers

Purchase two or more titles
and get free shipping
anywhere in the US
(see How To Order for details)


Also available through our partnership with
Bamboo Leaf Studio
Linoleum Block Prints
from the Smoking Poets series

and the Faux Koan series by Pat Nolan

Order two or more prints
get free shipping
and receive a bonus broadside of
the limited edition
Dylan Thomas print accompanied by Pat Nolan’s
Advice To A Young Poet
Free!!

 

Exile In Paradise FREE SHIPPING

27 Oct

Praise for Exile In Paradise

“Nolan has given Solitude, itself, a voice in this rich lyric of nature.  A luminosity of flickering bursts pause and magnify now moments of being alive.  His quotidian soaks us with its presence.  His lines trace the air.”
—Maureen Owen, author of Erosion’s Pull and Edges of Water

“Reading these poems, I feel like I’m walking down a village lane somewhere in China, beyond the reach of the emperor’s minions, and every door I walk by, someone invites me in for a cup of wine. At this rate, I don’t think I’ll ever make it out of here, and why should I?”
—Bill Porter (Red Pine), translator, author of Finding Them Gone: Visiting China’s Poets from the Past


 

The poems of Exile In Paradise are derived from a lifelong appreciation of classical Chinese poetry. This selection by Pat Nolan marks an almost fifty year creative engagement with Asian literature in translation. Chinese poetry is image rich and largely dependent for its overall effect on the juxtaposition of these images in a discontinuous thread that is not unlike the successive frames of a film. Each of the poems finds its origin in a line translated from an ancient Chinese poet. Although removed by degrees of separation from the originals in time and language, their impulse remains the same: to call up the perceptual as a song of celebration in sacred engagement with the world.

Pat Nolan has lived in silent cunning exile along the Russian River in Northern California for over forty years.  His poetry, prose and translations have appeared in numerous literary magazines and anthologies in North America, Europe and Asia.  He has worked as a bartender, rock band manager, trail crew grunt, radio DJ, janitor, preschool teacher, and emergency dispatcher.  The author of three novels and over a dozen poetry books, he is also publisher of Nualláin House, Publishers and maintains this literary blog.


Failed in Letters Happy in Life

“Cherishing my ineptness I’m carefree to the end”
enjoying a little peace cup of herb tea cold
attentive to the sound of the eaves overflowing
after a rush of late winter rain passes through
where I have gone wrong fills many notebooks
file cabinets bulging with personal hyperbole
here mistake after mistake accumulates like dust
documents of my timeless imperfection


FREE SHIPPING
~offer has been extended through November 15th, 2017~
FREE SHIPPING

Exile In Paradise
November, 2017
$16.00~paper~100 pages~6×9~ISBN 978-0-9840310-5-4

is only available from the publisher
Go to How To Order for details

Exile In Paradise now available for preorder

4 Oct

Exile In Paradise
by Pat Nolan

will be available early November, 2017
Order before October 31st, 2017 and get free shipping
(see How To Order for details)

 

 

ISBN 978-0-9840310-5-4~ 6×9~ paper~100 pages~$16

The poems of Exile In Paradise are derived from a lifelong appreciation of classical Chinese poetry. This selection by Pat Nolan marks an almost fifty year creative engagement with Asian literature in translation. Chinese poetry is image rich and largely dependent for its overall effect on the juxtaposition of these images in a discontinuous thread that is not unlike the successive frames of a film. Each of the poems finds its origin in a line translated from an ancient Chinese poet. Although removed by degrees of separation from the originals in time and language, their impulse remains the same: to call up the perceptual as a song of celebration in sacred engagement with the world.


Praise for Exile In Paradise

“Nolan has given Solitude, itself, a voice in this rich lyric of nature.  A luminosity of flickering bursts pause and magnify now moments of being alive.  His quotidian soaks us with its presence.  His lines trace the air.”  —Maureen Owen, author of Erosion’s Pull and Edges of Water

“Reading these poems, I feel like I’m walking down a village lane somewhere in China, beyond the reach of the emperor’s minions, and every door I walk by, someone invites me in for a cup of wine. At this rate, I don’t think I’ll ever make it out of here, and why should I?” —Bill Porter (Red Pine), translator, author of Finding Them Gone: Visiting China’s Poets from the Past


 

The Hand of an Old Friend

“Day’s late glazing rays already deep in the yard”

as a bee in amber I’m captured by a rich light

faint breeze rustles bamboo grove half in shadows

that sense of well being so fleeting visits again after

days of feeling like someone’s standing on my heart

that heaviness relieved as Autumn’s orange glare

warms my shoulder like the hand of an old friend

 

Autumn, 2017: Exile In Paradise

10 Sep

Coming from
Nualláin House, Publishers

Exile In Paradise

by Pat Nolan
Autumn of 2017

The poems of Exile In Paradise are derived from a lifelong appreciation of Chinese poetry. Originally published as a selection in limited edition by Bamboo Leaf Studio in 2010, this further iteration of eighty poems by Pat Nolan marks an almost fifty year creative engagement in comparative literature with Chinese prosody.  Chinese poetry is image rich and largely dependent for its overall effect on the juxtaposition of these images in a discontinuous thread that is not unlike the successive frames of film.  Each of the poems in Exile In Paradise finds its origin in a line translated from an ancient Chinese poet.  The body of the poem consists of an improvisation from that line with the aim of using elements of Chinese prosody such as parataxis and parallelism while being cognizant that Chinese nouns have no number, verbs have no tense, few if any conjunctions or prepositional indicators, and that each line contains its own integrity, apart from any overarching discursive intent.  The poems of Exile In Paradise, while clearly original, endeavor to achieve a synthesis between a historically distant culture and the contemporaneous radically different literature of today.


from the introduction to Exile In Paradise by Pat Nolan:
Some fifty years ago a friend loaned or gifted me Kenneth Rexroth’s One Hundred Poems from the Chinese, and as is commonly acknowledged a loaned book is often an unintended gift. The immediacy of these translations rests on their plain spoken imagism.  Undoubtedly much of that is due to Rexroth being of the Williams-Pound tell-it-as-you-see-it persuasion of American poetry.  The gift was my introduction to Chinese poetry.
            What at first was merely idle curiosity has become a lifelong passion leading me to read just about everything I can find relating to Chinese poetry, from Witter Bynner to Mike O’Connor.  Over the years I have assembled a library of anthologies and collections beginning with Arthur Waley’s Translations from the Chinese and Robert Payne’s The White Pony to more current editions complied by translators Burton Watson, Jonathan Chaves, David Hinton and Red Pine (Bill Porter).  With each collection or critical study I learn something new.   


Failed in Letters Happy in Life

“Cherishing my ineptness I’m carefree to the end”

enjoying a little peace cup of herb tea cold

attentive to the sound of the eaves overflowing

after a rush of late winter rain passes through

where I have gone wrong fills many notebooks

file cabinets bulging with personal hyperbole

here mistake after mistake accumulates like dust

documents of my timeless imperfection


Reserve a copy now!   

Michael Fisher, The Art of Illustration

10 Dec

Free-lance Illustrator/Graphic Artist Michael Fisher has lived in Sonoma County for forty four years, primarily in the West County in and around the town of Monte Rio.  Over the years his illustrations and poster designs have been used to advertise scores of music venues, rock concerts, literary events and projects, and local businesses.  In the tradition of jack-of-all-(artistic) trades, Michael was once a popular bartender (perhaps the most popular) at the pre ’86 flood Village Inn in Monte Rio where between shaking, stirring, and pouring he managed to produce a pithy comic strip entitled Malice In Blenderland which was featured in Sonoma County’s original independent newspaper of the 70’s and 80’s, The Sonoma County Stump.

EPSON MFP imageAlong with his free-lance gigs as an illustrator, Michael was also active in the local musical theater scene where he was the featured performer for such popular productions as Little Shop of Horrors and Dracula-la.  And many will remember that he once fronted the oldies rock band, The Grey Cats, as lead singer and harmonica, and whose annual Halloween productions were delightfully beyond words.  Grey Cats flyers and concert posters designed by Michael Fisher are now considered collector’s items by the hip cognoscenti. Although probably apocryphal, it is believed that one of Michael’s early inspirations was Gypsy Rose Lee’s theme song, Let Me Entertain You.  His wit and spontaneity are always on display often centered on his awesome encyclopedic knowledge of arcane and weird pop trivia.  His playfulness and readiness to entertain served him well in his long career in children’s services where he was also just one of the kids.  Now retired, Michael is devoting himself to his first love, drawing, with nearly daily postings to his blog, Aldo & Me.

coverland11To say that Michael’s cartooning style is ‘old school’ might be an understatement.  Anyone familiar with the underground comics of the 60’s counterculture will recognize the stylistic similarities. The same wacky and irreverent world views of R. Crumb, S. Clay Wilson, and Gilbert Shelton are present in Michael’s panels.  However his influences in cartooning go back even further to the likes of Jimmy Hatlo, Al Capp’s L’il Abner, and Walt Kelly’s Pogo.  What is evident of Michael’s skills is a unique virtuosity and imagination as is amply expressed in the sold out limited edition of his 2017 Aldo & Me West Sonoma County Calendar. (As of this writing, a few were still available for sale at the 5&10 in Guerneville).  His versatility in illustration is not limited to a narrow range of renderings but encompasses the entire array of contemporary comic arts, from South Park and Peanuts to the Simpsons.

aldomrnatural

A word about Michael Fisher’s virtuosity and range of illustrating talents: unique in an artist’s repertoire is the ability to see three dimensions and translate them into a depiction of two dimensions while providing the illusion of a third through modeling, shadowing, and textural crosshatching.  Michael is the master of all such techniques and his expert renditions testify to his imagination and illustrative skills.  Not unexpected for someone who has spent a lifetime perfecting his gift for illustration.  The accomplished depictions mirror a whimsical ruefully aware sensibility scripted in the dialogue bubbles as well as through the illusionist stroke of a drawn line and its suggestive minimalism, as demonstrated by a profound intuition of how the eye sees and distinguishes abstract representation.   Even the simplest of his sketches retain the vitality of their representation.  His knack for breaking down the visual world to its basic components enables him to present those objects in a variety of ways by re-imagining them as abstract design elements.

To the literate of the comic strip genre, the subtleties of a work of illustration lie beneath the message. As such cartoon depictions constitute a visual language. Michael is quite fluent in a variety of the style dialects of this language.  The near daily postings on his blog Aldo & Me attest not only to his genius as an illustrator but the seemingly inexhaustible consistency of his output.  The sheer creative energy expended can undoubtedly be measured in kilowatts.

EPSON MFP image

As compositions the drawings and sketches of an accomplished artist like Michael offer an originality in variation and theme that speaks of a unified aesthetic.  His command of the stylistic elements of the genre is truly astonishing.  Confident of his proficiency, he once made an offer to friends and fans alike to include any one of them in his blog strip and to depict them as any cartoon character or in any style they desired.  For a fee, of course.  Not surprisingly, a few jumped at the chance.  Presumably that offer is still in effect.

southpark

courtesy of the King/Nolan Collection

Michael’s talented renditions are available for perusal as a three panel cartoon blog, Aldo & Me, where he has regularly posted his pithy and often wacky interactions and observations on the WordPress platform for the past five years.  For the most part the panels are joyful and lighthearted entertainment depicting the dialogue between a man and his dog (maybe that should be dogalogue) as observations and commentary on the vicissitudes of life.  On occasion, barbed and pointed sarcasm emerges from the mild mannered strip in the guise of the super illustrator, The Doodler (he of the pencil extension) and his faithful companion, large fanged enforcer Alldog. A humming bird and an extraterrestrial jelly fish also join in the discourse as does a South of the Border feline, Furnando.  The consciousness behind Aldo & Me exhibits an evolved earth conscious awareness of one of the intelligent of the species as represented by a temperate self-deprecating humor and playfulness whose discerning perceptions always hit their mark whether it is lampooning the pompous or jarring the funny bone.

coffee-cup

from Fundamental, Toy Poems (1983) by Pat Nolan-Stencil design by Michael Fisher

As with earlier (and rare) posters and flyers, Michael Fisher’s  Aldo & Me original panels are catching on with the more knowledgeable as must-have collector’s items.  It is a sure sign of being au courant to have a few signed Fishers tastefully framed on display throughout the household where a guest or visitor might happen upon them and be delighted by the remarkable talent, not to mention the possessor’s discerning taste.

 

EPSON MFP image

Although a California transplant by way of Florida (also known for its citrus), Michael Fisher has adopted an age old Californios tradition of migrating south from Alta California during its chilly, flood-prone rainy season to the sunny congenial climes of Baja California and the little village of Todos Santos on the Pacific shore.  There the artist can stretch out on his hammock, watch the lizards scurry along the walls of the hacienda, and bask in the leisure of his creative energy.  That’s where he is right now, knocking out terrific three panel entertainments such as these:

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Michael Fisher is a working artist and illustrator.  His almost daily exercises in the illustrators art can be viewed at aldome.wordpress.com.  Once on site, intrepid internet travelers can click on the Aldo’s Shop & Bark link in the sidebar (on the left hand side just below the header) to sample some of the pencil magic available for purchase, as well as information on how to get in touch with Michael and make one of his fantastic works of art your own.


 

Seasonal Specials from Nualláin House

29 Nov

20% Off on All Titles & Free Shipping*
(offer good thru 12/31/15)

Order all five titles and save even more!

Get all five Nualláin House titles for just $60!!
Save over $20!!!

*(free shipping in US only)

Send check or money order
(made payable to ‘Pat Nolan’)
for the listed Sale price to

Nualláin House, Publishers
Box 798  Monte Rio, CA 95462.


ontheroadfront300ON THE ROAD TO LAS CRUCES; Being A Novel Account of The Last Day In The Life of A Legendary Western Lawman
by Pat Nolan

 Pat Nolan’s first published novel, On The Road To Last Cruces; Being A Novel Account of The Last Day In The Life of A Legendary Western Lawman is the story of youthful bravado and an old man’s regret, and as much a dusty tale of buffalo hunts and shoot-outs as a politically driven “whodunit.”  November 2011 ~ 154 pages

 

THE LAST RESORT
A Lee Malone Adventure
by Pat Nolan

Pat Nolan has written a fast paced, tongue-in-cheek, pun filled comedy of errors, misunderstandings, and faux intuition in the mode of a 1930’s pulp thriller.  Instead of the typical splinter-jawed, broken nosed, tobacco breathed tough guy hero, Nolan upends the stereotype by introducing a gorgeous internationally famous former fashion model whose super power is her beauty.
August 2012~ 212 pages

 

 

HELLO LIFE
Poems by Gail King 

The poems of Hello Life achieve their freshness in the particularity of experience. The poet surrenders herself to the moment and tenders that subtle cognition as a delighted welcome to life. The ease of her expression in dealing with the everyday communicates an uncommon wisdom. The poems present, through playful understatement and sly humor, the immediacy of spontaneous impressions.
December 2013  ~  64 pages

 

 

 

Your Name Here
New Poems
by Pat Nolan 

The poems in Your Name Here revolve around that quantum axis with seemingly random discontinuities that do not pin down meaning but are left to mean themselves. Nolan’s poetry enacts a sub-vocal monologue that is like the murmur of cosmic background radiation, noticeable only in its cessation or as pauses when the mind registers the sum of discrete moments in an instant.  November 2014 ~ 80 pages

 

Poetry For Sale
Haikai no Renga (Linked Poetry)

Introduction by Pat Nolan
The eleven haikai no renga included in Poetry For Sale were written over period of nearly thirty years by Pat Nolan and his renku collaborators, Keith Kumasen Abbott, Sandy Berrigan, Gloria Frym, Steven Lavoie, Joen Eshima Moore, Maureen Owen, Michael Sowl, and John Veglia.  In these pages haikai no renga is synthesized as a brief, highly suggestive, well spoken, maddeningly ambiguous, read-between-the-lines kind of poetry tuned to a common understanding.  October 2015 ~ 152 pages

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